Results tagged “icloud”

A Show of Hands, How Many People Back Up The Photos On Their Phone?

By Michael Mulvey on November 20, 2013 3:22 PM

BGR: iCloud was Jobs' best shot at killing Dropbox... and it missed badly

When Steve Jobs met with the DropBox founders before Apple announced iCloud, he famously told them they had a "feature, not a product."

As of today, DropBox is very much a product to me and integral to my everyday workflow both in the office and out.

I use iCloud too, but I have to say not just iCloud, but file syncing in general has a long way to go before it's easy for non-nerds to comprehend and use. I'm surprised how many non-nerds still don't understand the difference and relationship between their Photostream and their iCloud account.

There's a lot of smartphone users who carry around thousands of photos with them, and usually have few to none of them backed up.

It's a very real problem.

Cloudy

By Michael Mulvey on April 23, 2013 7:34 AM

I'm not sure what's inside Apple's insanely great data centers, but apparently not my synced Safari tabs (some of 'em), nor sequential transcripts of my Messages.

Yes, it still seems Google is getting better at design faster than Apple is getting better at web services.

Sync Your Wife's iPhone. Now.

By Michael Mulvey on July 30, 2012 1:19 AM

Do me a favor. Make sure your wife's (of girlfriend's) iPhone has been synced and has an iCloud account associated with it. Right now. Do it.

I'm not saying this to sound like Don Draper. I'm saying this because most of women I know don't sync their iPhones. Like my friend Frank, who texted me frantically this weekend because his baby daughter drooled all over his wife's iPhone and then she plugged it in to charge it and it got 'fried'.

Now the photos of their daughter's first 6 months of life are gone.

Apple's Genius Bar people said the only option they had left was to use a third party data recovery company to get their data back. Oh, and it would probably run them over $1,000 (*I told Frank to drop the iPhone into a container of dry rice. This helps suck out all the moisture from electronic devices and sometimes can save them from water (or drool) damage. It's no guarantee but it's worth trying.).

Some people are wary of iCloud. They're wary of trusting all their data 'in the cloud'. Frank's wishing he had it right now.

Update: While you're at it, you should also remind those non-techie friends of yours in finance to back up their iPhones too. And your Uncle Bob too.

You're Welcome, Acer.

By Michael Mulvey on January 9, 2012 10:34 AM

Jim Dalrymple mocks up the home page for AcerCloud, free of charge.

Looks about right to me.

What a gentleman he was to do that.

Influencer/Influenced

By Michael Mulvey on January 9, 2012 9:18 AM

Influencer: Apple iCloud, introduced 6 June 2011
keynote_iCloud.jpg

Influenced: Acer AcerCloud, introduced 8 January 2012
keynote_AcerCloud.jpg

Yes, Apple's competitors continue to rip off their ideas, but I give them credit for understanding it's not just about the devices, but the ecosystem in which they live.

But could Acer have made a shittier looking cloud? Jeez.

Images via The Verge

Ground Vs. Cloud

By Michael Mulvey on November 2, 2011 11:38 AM

Randy Murray thinks about cloud computing and the end of updates:

We've already gone past the point where we have to go out and buy updates on discs. Now we download and update. And soon your device will update itself as it sits unused.

For some this may be frightening. We need to think long and hard about trusting all of our data to others. We need to think seriously about maintaining our own media and backups.

While he expresses caution, overall he's excited about the freedom such a move to the cloud affords us.

I too am pro-cloud, and currently use iCloud and DropBox on a regular basis, but I'm also cognizant of what I sync. I'm also not a criminal, so I don't worry about being *caught* doing something.

As I've written about before, though, I'm also I strong believer in keeping things on the Ground as well as in the Cloud. My music files, my photos, my videos, my documents, my designs -- all my stuff is in my possession on my own external hard drives. On the ground.

Sun and iClouds

By Michael Mulvey on October 25, 2011 9:48 PM

Katie Fehrenbacher for GigaOM reports that Apple is building a solar farm for it's data center:

Apple has been laying plans for a solar farm next to its massive data center in Maiden, North Carolina, according to The Charlotte Observer. The solar project -- dubbed Project Dolphin Solar Farm -- will reportedly be built on 171 acres of land across the street from Apple's planned $1 billion data center, which had the code name Project Dolphin, but is now being called iDataCenter, and will likely partly serve the Apple's cloud-based service iCloud.

It's great to see they're investing in solar.

iCloud - At Least the Foundation Is Solid

By Michael Mulvey on October 25, 2011 8:43 PM

Dave Caolo vents about iCloud in iOS 5 (via The Loop):

iCloud's Photo Stream feature is handy, in that it pushes photos shot with a compatible iPhone, iPad or iPod touch to Apple's servers and then back to other authorized devices. Meanwhile, iOS 5 has tweeting built in, so there's a temptation to shoot photo with Apple's Camera app and then tweet it from the Camera Roll.

That's fast and convenient, but also a hindrance. Specifically, my iPhone, iPad and Mac are now cluttered with space-hogging one-offs I shot for the sake of a tweet or a Facebook update. 1 What's worse is that you can't delete such throw-away photos from your Photo Stream with an iDevice. Instead, you've got to visit icloud.com and click "Reset Photo Stream," which nukes the lot, good and bad. That's why I've started using Camera+ again for tweeting pictures.

I've noticed this too as someone who recently upgraded his first gen iPad and iPhone 4 to iOS 5.

The chain of my reactions to said iCloud issue/feature/bug has been:

1) Awesome! Everything is synchronized!

and then:

2) Shit, everything is synchronized.

The glass-half-full side of me sees this as the iCloud '1.0'. Which it is. Like iOS 1.0 (aka iPhone OS), iCloud has issues. It's missing features, but as far as this specific gripe about synchronization, from the Apple side of things, this is great. Everything is working as it's supposed to. The foundation has been laid.

I'm not trying to spin things as iCloud being perfect, because it's not, but things could be a lot worse. This could be MobileMe all over again. Remember, we just learned in the last week of Steve Jobs trying to buy Dropbox in 2009 and being turned down. This meant Apple had to figure out file synchronizing on their own.

So yes, things are very raw right now with iCloud and how it handles photos, but improvements are en route.

I guarantee it.

Remember, that's how Apple rolls.

It's poetic, really.

By Michael Mulvey on October 12, 2011 9:24 PM

RIM has worldwide outages the days leading up to and on the day Apple launches it's new mobile operating system and cloud-based backup service.

It's poetic, really.

Remember though, RIM has two, count them, TWO CEOs. I'm sure they have this under control.

I've Got My Stuff Wherever I Am

By Michael Mulvey on June 27, 2011 8:18 AM

This video of Steve Jobs giving the closing keynote of the 1997 Worldwide Develops Conference (via) is awesome on 2 levels.

First, it's awesome on the macro level. Jobs on the mic - showing clarity of vision, expressing that vision clearly and concisely and showing he understands the technology space. For anyone who's seen any of his other keynotes over the years, this isn't shocking, but it's just fun to watch him command the stage.

The second level of awesome is on the micro level and it happens at around the 14:40 mark (my emphasis):

Ok, let me describe the world I live in. About 8 years ago we had high speed networking connected to our now obsolete NeXT hardware, running NeXTSTEP at the time and because we using NFS, we were able to take all of our personal data, our 'home directories' as we called them, off of our local machines and put them on a server. And the software made that completely transparent and because the server had a lot of RAM on it, in some cases it was actually faster to get stuff from the server than it was to get stuff off your local hard disk because in some cases it was cached in the RAM of the server if it was in popular use.

But what was really remarkable, was that the organization could hire a professional person to back up that server every night and could afford to spend a little more on that server so maybe it had redundant disk drives and redundant power supplies. And you know, in the last seven years, you know how many times I have lost personal data? ZERO. Do you know how many times I have backed up my computer? ZERO. I have computers at Apple, at NeXT, at Pixar and at home. I walk up to any of em, and log in as myself. It goes over the network, finds my home directory on the server and I've got my stuff wherever I am.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but he's just described iCloud. But in 1997. I understand what he described in the keynote was networked storage, and not actually downloading things locally to your device(s), but the experience he describes is the heart of iCloud - "It goes over the network, finds my home directory on the server and I've got my stuff wherever I am."

Here we are in 2011, just now catching up to Jobs' vision.

2  

Daily Exhaust is hosted by DreamHost, powered by Movable Type with Minted statistics.