Results tagged “nokia”

Spinning Wheels

By Michael Mulvey on November 18, 2013 1:31 PM

What's the non-iPhone smartphone world baking up these days?

Curved displays and 41-megapixel cameras:

I guess you can argue that some consumers need the 41-megapixel camera that Nokia introduced a few months ago. But the number of people who care about that is a sliver of the overall market. Things get even murkier with the Samsung Galaxy Round and its curved display. Technically, this feature does have marginal utility. When you rock the phone as it lies on its convex side, you can glimpse messages on the display if you happen to be looking at it sideways. This is pretty much the definition of "grasping at straws" when it comes to feature innovation.

It's seems like companies are just spinning their wheels while they wait for whatever Apple might announce in 2014.

Don't Forget About the Flipside

By Michael Mulvey on July 31, 2013 11:08 AM

BGR asks, Does Nokia have a backup plan if its bet on camera quality falls through?

My question is, does the Lumia 1020 have equally amazing camera software for their camera hardware? The interplay of software and hardware is how one fully experiences a device.

It's like bragging about a car with 800 horsepower that can't make turns.

Misjudging

By Michael Mulvey on July 22, 2013 7:59 AM

switcher_windows_phone.png

Horace Dediu:

By the way, $900 million write-off could amount to over 3 million devices, more if Microsoft is assuming some residual value in the inventory. Misjudging demand to such a degree that more units are disposed of than sold implies a basic failure of understanding of hardware businesses.

Horace is great at explaining the state of the computer industry, but nothing speaks louder than his eye-opening charts.

Rule the World

By Michael Mulvey on December 21, 2012 11:29 AM

Every time theres more bad news about Nokia, the more my ironic this 2009 cover from Fast Company becomes:

I originally posted this on 22 Oct 2009.

Nokia Maps. No.

By Michael Mulvey on November 20, 2012 9:35 AM

I just downloaded and started playing around with the new Nokia Maps application, Here, for iOS (via Jim Darymple).

I can't yet vouch for how much better or worse the accuracy of the maps data is compared to Apple's own Maps app, but on sheer software quality alone there's a world of difference. What I mean is Here feels like crap. Transitions are choppy, the color palette is cold (blue and grey?) and almost every time I tap to zoom in a level of detail all the tiles flicker while they re-render. Weird.

The experience seems to be consistently jerky on both my iPhone 4 and my iPad 2. If I didn't know better I might attribute the choppy behavior to hardware deficiency, but since I've been using the native, iOS Maps app for over a month now, I know this can't be the reason. Just compare the difference in Human Experience between the two and feel how much smoother Apple's Maps app is.

Also, what's the thinking (or lack thereof) behind the Here logo skewed at a 45 degree angle with the leg of the 'h' cut off?

The whole experience is leaving a bad taste in my OS.

Colorful Influence

By Michael Mulvey on September 14, 2012 3:30 PM

Ladies and gentlemen, today's Influencer/Influenced post comes as a surprise to me (and it might to you as well).

Today Apple is not the Influencer, but the Influenced.

(Note: I know this very well might not be the case, given how far in advance Apple develops new products. If anything, you could say Apple is the influencer here since it's likely they'll be shipping new Nanos before Nokia even *announces* their ship date)

Influencer: Nokia Lumia 920, announced 5 Spetember 2012

Nokia Lumia 920 yellow

Influenced: Apple iPod Nano, announced 12 September 2012

iPod Nano 2012 yellow

Colorful Influence

By Michael Mulvey on September 14, 2012 3:30 PM

Ladies and gentlemen, today's Influencer/Influenced post comes as a surprise to me (and it might to you as well).

Today Apple is not the Influencer, but the Influenced.

(Note: I know this very well might not be the case, given how far in advance Apple develops new products. If anything, you could say Apple is the influencer here since it's likely they'll be shipping new Nanos before Nokia even *announces* their ship date)

Influencer: Nokia Lumia 920, announced 5 Spetember 2012

Nokia Lumia 920 yellow

Influenced: Apple iPod Nano, announced 12 September 2012

iPod Nano 2012 yellow

Nevermind

By Michael Mulvey on September 5, 2012 8:24 PM

Is that Nokia's new phone in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

Oh wait, Nokia hasn't announced a ship date, it couldn't be a new Nokia phone in your pocket.

Seriously though, that is a big phone:

Nokia_920.jpg

Preparation

By Michael Mulvey on September 5, 2012 7:56 PM

Beautiful new phones by Nokia. With no release date.

It's clear all of Apple's competitors are announcing their new products ahead of Apple's September 12 event.

The thing is, whether or not Apple explicitly announces a new product event, everyone and their mother should know when Apple is dropping a new product. Their product refresh cycle is very regular. Hell, MacRumors has a Buyer's Guide (for at least the 8 years I've been visiting their site) to find out when you should expect new versions of each device Apple makes.

So we're now into year 5 of regular iPhone releases and these clowns still aren't ready? No excuse.

Ruling the World

By Michael Mulvey on June 14, 2012 11:30 AM

The NYTimes is reporting Nokia is cutting 10,000 jobs as part of an "emergency overhaul".

Remember this Fast Company cover from a few years ago:

Remember, the technology world is volatile.

Shit changes quickly.

Fit and Finnish (and Influenced)

By Michael Mulvey on May 12, 2012 5:10 PM

Influencer: Apple.com, site design since before 2008
apple_website_May2012.jpg

Influenced: Nokia.com, site design since 2012
nokia_website_May2012.jpg

More Sugar

By Michael Mulvey on April 9, 2012 11:31 AM

NYTimes: On Release Date, Crucial Nokia Phone Is Hard to Buy in New York

AT&T said last month that when Nokia's new Lumia 900 phone went on sale April 8, it would benefit from the company's biggest product introduction ever, exceeding even the iPhone's.

The big day is here. But nearly all 39 AT&T stores within proximity of Times Square in Manhattan were either closed for Easter Sunday or did not answer phone calls. The few that were open did not have the handset in stock.

This is probably the last chance Microsoft has to prove itself relevant in mobile space as the traditional desktop PC is pulled from it's position as the computer for everyday use.

So what do they do? (I say *they* because former Microsoft executive Stephen Elop is running Nokia and made the decision to move all their smartphones to Windows Phone)

They launch their flagship phone on Easter Sunday. When everything is closed.

So smart.

When I see Microsoft/Nokia continue to make fumbles like this I wonder if it's something deeper than the fact Microsoft was run by an engineer who doesn't understand Human Experience and design until it was run by a man who knows neither engineers and developers nor design and Human Experience.

People half-jokingly have said Bill Gates has Asperger's Syndrome due to his social deficiencies. He understands how computers and software work inside and out, but it's the people who use his software he never seems to have a clue about.

So my theory is when Bill Gates stepped down as CEO of Microsoft in 2000 he transferred his inabilities to communicate with and make software for humans to the rest of the company --via some hybrid human/computer virus -- and subsequently, Stephen Elop and Nokia.

What else could explain such a fucked up product launch?

Actually, it could also be the people at Microsoft and Nokia aren't humans at all. Remember how the alien at the beginning of Men In Black wore the skin of that farmer to disguise himself?

Yeah, something like that could be happening too.

Grenade Whistle

By Michael Mulvey on December 20, 2011 10:41 PM

WSJ: Microsoft, Nokia Flirted With RIM:

Microsoft Corp. and Nokia Corp. in recent months flirted with the idea of making a joint bid for Research In Motion Ltd., according to people familiar with the matter.

Really? Microsoft and Nokia flirted with RIM? This RIM?

Like the way Vinny, Pauly and the Situation flirt with grenades to bring home at the end of the night?

I think we need a grenade whistle any time a company gets close to RIM.

Do Microsoft and Nokia have technology beer goggles on that make RIM appear like a valuable acquisition?

Pictures Under *Bendy* Glass

By Michael Mulvey on November 14, 2011 9:27 AM

Last month Microsoft treated us another one of their future-vision videos they love to do, since solving mobile and tablet computing in the present is so damn hard.

Not to be out-done, Nokia has released their own future-vision short.

I'd love to hear what Bret Victor thinks about this one.

via PSFK

A Red Ocean for Nokia and Microsoft

By Michael Mulvey on November 2, 2011 1:20 PM

Dan Frommer asks the key 'why' questions about Windows Mobile phones from Nokia:

  • Why should any person buy this instead of an iPhone or the preferred Android phone du jour?
  • Why should carriers favor Windows phones over Android or Apple phones, in either their in-store sales techniques and marketing?
  • Why should carriers or consumers favor Nokia Windows phones over similar Windows phones from Samsung, HTC, etc.?
  • Why should developers make apps for Windows or Nokia phones?

Windows Mobile phones are swimming a red ocean.

So what is a 'red ocean' you ask?

From Wikipedia:

Red Oceans are all the industries in existence today--the known market space. In the red oceans, industry boundaries are defined and accepted, and the competitive rules of the game are known. Here companies try to outperform their rivals to grab a greater share of product or service demand. As the market space gets crowded, prospects for profits and growth are reduced. Products become commodities or niche, and cutthroat competition turns the ocean bloody. Hence, the term red oceans.

Red oceans are the opposite of blue oceans:

Blue oceans, in contrast, denote all the industries not in existence today--the unknown market space, untainted by competition. In blue oceans, demand is created rather than fought over. There is ample opportunity for growth that is both profitable and rapid. In blue oceans, competition is irrelevant because the rules of the game are waiting to be set. Blue ocean is an analogy to describe the wider, deeper potential of market space that is not yet explored.

Apple established the *new* smartphone paradigm (full touchscreen, no keyboard, multitouch UI) with the launch of the iPhone in 2007 that Google subsequently copied with Android. Apple's modus operandi since Jobs returned has been about focusing on blue oceans. Untapped markets.

Now Microsoft and Nokia are entering the market with the Windows Phone 7 platform, a platform that introduces a unique approach to the user interface.

Despite their fresh approach, they're still in a red ocean. Boundaries and known and rules are understood and as Frommer notes, they're going to continue to have a hard time distinguishing themselves in this already crowded market.

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