Chewbacca in Queens… with a Chevette.

Below are a few shots of me at my Grandma's house in Middle Village, Queens. Early 80's. Yes, that's my father's blue Chevette behind me.

You can barely see it, but behind the Chevette is my Grandma's '63 Ford Fairlane in the garage.

My mom made me the Chewy costume by hand. I used to wear it to bed and even tried to wear it school but my mom shot that idea down.

Chewbacca_01.jpg
Chewbacca_02.jpg
Chewbacca_03.jpg

Categories:

Personal

Tags:

Snow Fall

Pretty amazing piece over on the NYTimes.com called Snow Fall.

I have Flash disabled on my machine but they're using some beautiful, fullscreen animated GIF loops for motion.

Categories:

Human Experience

Tags:

MySpace

I received an early invite to test-drive the new MySpace. Time will tell if they can make a comeback, but they're definitely doing some interesting things from a UI/Design standpoint.

Hit me up on Twitter if you'd like an invite. I have 7 left.

Categories:

Community

Tags:

Back in Black

I'm back in New York and New Jersey for the holidays and it feels good.

Although, it must have been a while since I've driven through the Holland Tunnel because this morning I paid $13 to go through.

Seriously, thirteen dollars?

I didn't even get a cup of coffee or a cookie or anything.

Holland_Tunnel_thirteen_dollars_Dec2012.jpg

Categories:

Travel

Tags:

No Fat to Trim

I've been reading a lot of articles and blog posts about people leaving Twitter or Facebook, or switching from a smartphone to a 'dumbphone'.

I like the general idea of hitting the reset button on social networks and technologies. Flushing out the old to make way for the new can be healthy in both your physical and virtual lives.

Earlier this week I decided to unsubscribe from all my RSS feeds. After a week without a healthy new supply of feeds, I'm definitely craving my tech, design and cultural news fixes but as I slowing begin to repopulate my Reeder app with new feeds, I'm realizing my original set of feeds was already pretty paired-down and healthy.

So while technological reset buttons and New Year's Resolution Gym memberships can be great, what's better is maintaining your health at closer intervals. Why wait until the end of the year to drop 10 pounds or drop 10 junky RSS feeds? Why not exercise once a day and examine the quality of your feeds once a week?

Maintaining a consistent regimen throughout the year makes any annual 'check-ups' must easier and full of less surprises. It also makes drastic measures at the end of the year unnecessary.

Categories:

Productivity

Tags:

Pinch To Zoom

Reuters:

U.S. patent authorities rejected Apple Inc's key "pinch-to-zoom" patent in an initial ruling, the second setback in less than two months for the iPhone maker in its patent battle with Samsung Electronics Co Ltd.

This rejection is good for everyone. Apple shouldn't be the only company able to use pinch-to-zoom on mobile devices. They definitely didn't invent it (that link is a TED Talk by Jeff Han from 2006, one year before the iPhone debuted.).

Also—it's not "pinch-to-zoom". It's pinch-to-zoom-out and spread-to-zoom-in. That drives me insane.

Categories:

Human Experience

Tags:

A Tough Little Stinker

They show me a picture of the character and then they show me a storyboard which tells what this character is going to do in the cartoons. They said Bugs Bunny was a tough little stinker, so I had to make him tough. I thought, which is the toughest voice? Either Brooklyn or the Bronx. [in the Bugs voice] So I put da two of em tageddah, Doc. Dat's how I got da voice for Bugs. Heheheh.

—Mel Blanc on how he came up with the voice for Bugs Bunny

Categories:

Quotes

Tags:

Skyfall

Bugs_Bunny_skyfall.gif

My brother shared this great animated GIF he found on Tumblr (I think the original is from this site).

Not only is this a beautiful GIF, but it's also from one of my favorite Looney Toons Episodes of all time, Rabbit Rampage.

Categories:

Image

Tags:

Wave of the Future

From MIT Technology Review:

A woman who is completely paralyzed below the neck has regained the ability to reach out and interact with the world around her thanks to the most advanced brain-computer interface for operating a robotic arm so far.

In February, surgeons implanted two four-millimeter-by-four-millimeter electronics chips into the participant's motor cortex, the region of the brain that initiates movements. Each chip has 96 electrodes and is wired through the skull to a computer that translates her thoughts into signals for the robotic arm. The work, performed by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, is reported in the latest issue of The Lancet.

Controlling artificial limbs with your brain, phones with video chatting. Self-driving cars for Google.

We are officially living in the future.

Categories:

Technology

Tags:

Creator Tip: Repeat Yourself

If you create anything—music, art, design, film, writing—don't be afraid to repeat yourself throughout your career.

I used to be afraid of reposting content and reiterating ideas on this site for fear of being, well, repetitious. People have already seen this, I'm not going to post it again. Sure, some people will recognize images, videos and ideas I've posted before, but guess what? There's a good chance some, if not more people haven't seen what I'm reposting. To quote Merlin Mann, Every day someone is born who's never seen the Flintstones. This is true.

I'm not suggesting becoming a broken record and not trying new things, but if something resonates with you, if you're obsessed with a certain topic, don't be afraid to go balls out on it and attack it with all your energy. For me, creating repeated posts on a topic, like 'innovation', is my way of chewing on it and truly understanding it beyond a surface, scanning-the-Wikipedia-page level.

Think about the original iMac G3 from 1998. It was a breakthrough computer unlike any other on the market. Except maybe the original Macintosh 128K from 1984. The iMac was an all-in-one computer, like the original Macintosh and even had a handle on the top, like the original Macintosh. Steve Jobs wasn't afraid of repeating himself with ideas he knew worked.

The longer I keep this site running (six years and counting) the less I give a shit about repeating myself. It drives me a little bit crazy when I see a post on a prominent blog featuring some piece of content I posted months or even a year ago.

When I have an idea for a post, and it feels solid and relevant to me, I publish it.

Categories:

Career

Tags: